New paper! An enduring partnership between ciliates and bacteria

My latest paper has just been published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B! My colleagues and I describe how a partnership between a group of ciliates (a type of single-celled organism) called Kentrophoros and their bacterial symbionts had a single evolutionary origin. This is despite the fact that different species of Kentrophoros can look very different from each other and are found all over the world. The bacteria are also a lineage that is new to science, and that as far as we know is only associated with these ciliates. This means that after the first Kentrophoros and its bacterial partner got together tens or hundreds of millions of years ago, their descendants have diversified into different species and spread themselves throughout the globe, all the while remaining true to each other.

kentrophoros-bild.jpg

Kentrophoros sp. from the Mediterranean island of Elba. This ciliate carries a few hundred thousand bacterial symbionts (whitish mass) and is almost 2 mm long despite being a single cell.

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New gbtools release (v2.5.2)

Instead of working I’m procrastinating by fixing bugs in my software. The new version of gbtools includes two new features that improve the plotting of taxonomic markers, and some fixes to long-standing bugs. You can now adjust how many taxa are colored and included in the plot legend (thereby avoiding cluttered plots with too many colors to interpret), and also highlight individual taxa.

Wondering what gbtools is? Read my previous blog post, or the paper published last December.